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Quadruple-Vaccinated Pfizer CEO Admits He Has Tested Positive for Covid-19

Pfizer Chairman and CEO Albert Bourla has tested positive for Covid-19, despite being ‘quadruple vaccinated.’

Bourla admitted the embarrassing news on Monday morning in a Twitter post. But he did not hesitate to shamelessly plug the latest Pfizer therapeutic drug for Covid-19: Paxlovid.

“I would like to let you know that I have tested positive for #COVID19,” Bourla wrote. “I am thankful to have received four doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine, and I am feeling well while experiencing very mild symptoms. I am isolating and have started a course of Paxlovid.”

“Paxlovid is not approved, but is authorized for emergency use by the FDA to treat mild-to-moderate COVID-19 in high-risk patients 12+, weighing at least 40 kg, with positive results of SARS-CoV-2 viral testing,” Bourla added.

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This is not only a shameless plug for Pfizer’s new drug, it is an embarrassing confession that the ‘vaccines’ do not stop the spread or lower risk enough for the recipient that he or she does not have to also take a therapeutic. It is an admission that the ‘vaccines’ do not work as advertised.

President Biden was also quadruple jabbed for Covid-19, but nonetheless got a coronavirus infection (with no small sense of irony) accompanied by over a week of Covid positive tests despite taking Paxlovid. Then, he got a “rebound infection.”

“Folks, today I tested positive for COVID again,” Biden admitted. “This happens with a small minority of folks. I’ve got no symptoms but I am going to isolate for the safety of everyone around me. I’m still at work, and will be back on the road soon.”

However, The Atlantic reported on Paxlovid and revealed that these “rebound infections” are far from rare with Paxlovid.

Four days after recovering from a COVID-19 infection, President Joe Biden has tested positive again. When he first got sick, Biden—like more than one-third of the Americans who have tested positive for COVID-19 this summer, according to the U.S. government’s public records—was prescribed Paxlovid, an antiviral pill treatment made by Pfizer. Like many Paxlovid takers, he soon tested negative and resumed his normal activities. And then, like many Paxlovid takers, his infection came right back. (Biden does not currently have symptoms, according to his physician.)

With more than 40,000 prescriptions being handed out a day, we’re taking Paxlovid at about the same rate that we’re taking oxycodone. When Biden got sick last week, he started taking the pills before the day was out. When Anthony Fauci had COVID in June, he took two courses. That enthusiasm is in line with the government’s messaging around the drug.

Notably, the Atlantic article does a good job of discussing the issues that have arisen with Paxlovid.

The Biden administration has consistently hailed Paxlovid as an effective tool in the fight against SARS-CoV-2…

But some providers are prescribing the drug with a bit less enthusiasm, particularly when it comes to vaccinated patients (such as Biden and Fauci). Reshma Ramachandran, a family-medicine doctor and researcher at Yale, told me that she’s feeling a sense of “resignation” about Paxlovid. Though it’s one of the few COVID treatments she can offer, she can’t say with confidence that the pills will help someone who’s been immunized. […]

These questions remain unanswered (or incompletely answered) thanks to corporate secrecy, the minutiae of drug testing, and the necessary care with which human trials are conducted. But in a more fundamental way, the persistent fog around Paxlovid comes from the disease that it’s meant to alleviate. The pandemic is simply moving too quickly, the virus is evolving too fast, and our responses to it are changing too often for anyone to find unambiguous answers about one specific drug.

But all of this may be irrelevant, except for high-risk patients, due to natural immunity. According to the Covid-19 Serohub used by the National Institutes of Health and Centers for Disease Control and Infection, 99% of Americans had prior infection antibodies to Covid-19 as of December 2021.

 

The New England Journal of Medicine published a study in June proving that natural immunity is more effective than vaccinated immunity alone.

Natural immunity “protection was higher than that conferred after the same time had elapsed since receipt of a second dose of vaccine among previously uninfected persons,” the study concluded.

Thus, it is irrelevant for more than 99% of the U.S. public whether not a particular person is “vaccinated” for Covid-19. They already have natural immunity, which is superior to vaccinated immunity.

In March, CDC Director Rochelle Walensky admitted that more than 95% of Americans had some form of immune system protection against Covid-19.

There was a brief controversy in 2021 that arose after reports Bourla was purportedly not ‘fully vaccinated’ for Covid-19 after he canceled a trip to Israel. A Pfizer spokesperson told USA Today that report was ‘categorically false.’

“That report is categorically false,” Pfizer spokeswoman Sharon Castillo told USA TODAY via email. “Dr. Bourla has been fully vaccinated with the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine.”

Bourla in March 2021 then made a public display of getting his 2nd dose of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccines.

Excited to receive my 2nd dose of the Pfizer/BioNTech #COVID19 vaccine,” he wrote. “There’s nothing I want more than for my loved ones and people around the world to have the same opportunity. Although the journey is far from over, we are working tirelessly to beat the virus.”

It turns out that Bourla wasn’t “fully vaccinated” for Covid-19, after all. After his fourth jab, he is still getting Covid-19.

It is with no small sense of irony that multiple studies suggest that people who have taken the mRNA vaccines are more likely to test positive for Covid-19.

A product defect or a good business model? You be the judge.




OPINION: This article contains commentary which reflects the author's opinion.