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Newly Leaked Video Appears to Show Ray Epps Orchestrating Breach at the U.S. Capitol on January 6

    Newly released video appears to show January 6 agitator Ray Epps from an angle previously unseen before.

    The video, played at a Proud Boys’ trial and leaked to Gateway Pundit, tracks prior footage of Epps that has been verified by fact checkers. It appears to show Epps working the crowd behind the gates prior to the initial breach of the Capitol building grounds.

    At 1:34 in the video, Epps can be spotted walking near the gates where the breach would take place. You can see that Epps is very actively talking to the crowd and to police officers. He even turns to face the crowd, as if he were working ‘crowd control.’

    If you watch the video above, Epps follows Samsel into the Capitol building grounds. The police put up very little resistance to those who initally breached the grounds.

    Ray Epps ‘ activities can be witnessed in this full barricade breach source video at the timestamp 0:48:

    In the video above, Epps is coordinating with a clean-cut young man in a backwards hat. We later learn that this man is Ryan Samsel, who was singled out in the “breach team” for federal prosecution and prison persecution.

    As Politico noted about Epps’ activities on January 6: “Epps was also seen in footage just before 1 p.m. on Jan. 6 at the front of a line of Trump supporters who were among the first to breach the Capitol barricades. He whispered something into the ear of Ryan Samsel, who has been charged as one of the first defendants to breach secured Capitol grounds. Moments later, Samsel and others charged through a barricade, injuring a Capitol Police officer on the other side.”

    Samsel claims that Ray Epps told him “Dude’, relax, the cops are doing their job.” Shortly after the conversation, Samsel can be seen “moving forward and confronting the police in what amounted to the tipping point of the riot,” as the New York Times reported. Epps followed him afterwards into the Capitol Building grounds, matching the video shown above.

    However, this behavior would not match Ray Epps’ behavior from the night before when he acted as an agitator, which got him called out as a “Fed!” by Trump supporters.

    “I’m probably going to go to jail for it,” Epps said in a January 5th video. “Tomorrow we need to go into the Capitol! Into the Capitol” he yelled.

    “No!” the crowd yelled. This was followed by chants of “Fed! Fed! Fed! Fed!”

    The New York Times claims that Epps’ denials to the January 6 Committee about being a ‘federal informant’ in a closed-door hearing constitutes evidence that beliefs to the contrary have been “debunked.”

    The seemingly ubiquitous “mystery man” Ray Epps was not charged for his role in January 6, despite being captured on video the night before attempting to incite protesters to storm the Capitol building.

    A Politico report provides an excuse for why the FBI put Epps on the “most wanted list” and then surreptitiously took him off without an arrest — despite similar January 6 cases being prosecuted.

    “Epps, who has become the centerpiece of an unsupported GOP claim that the FBI incited the mob that ransacked the Capitol last year, met with the Jan. 6 select committee in November and told them he had no relationship to the FBI or any other federal law enforcement agency,” Kyle Cheney reported. “But the meeting was just a precursor to a more-formal transcribed interview this week, said Epps’ lawyer John Blischak.”

    “Blischak said he expected more details of Epps’ involvement to become public soon thereafter,” the Politico report added.

    Epps was caught on video coordinating with a protester who was involved in the first attack on Capitol police barricades.

    “Epps has kept a low profile since former President Donald Trump’s allies began promoting a theory that Epps was a federal agent and helped foment the attack,” the Politico report went on. “Their claims stem from videos taken on Jan. 5 showing Epps urging Trump allies to ‘go into the Capitol’ — an exhortation that some in the crowd quickly booed and responded to with chants accusing Epps of being a ‘fed.’ Epps quickly added that it should be done ‘peacefully’.”

    Ray Epps was among the very first people to instigate the January 6 riot. Here he appears to be giving instructions to a clean-cut, athletic young man, whom we later find out is Ryan Samsel.

    “But Epps did not appear to join in the violence and his lawyer says ‘he was never in the Capitol building’ — key factors in the Justice Department’s charging decisions,” the report adds.

    Epps demonstrated more inconsistent behavior. During the January 6 siege, he stood up for cops and law enforcement so they would not be hurt. You can see this inconsistent behavior in the video below.

    The New York Times also seems to have misled readers in an attempt to give Epps cover. On June 30th, the New York Times published a piece entitled Inside the Capitol Riot: An Exclusive Video Investigation. Revolver notes the Times told an outright lie about Ray Epps:

    Ray Epps, an Arizona man seen in widely-circulated videos telling Trump supporters on multiple occasions to go into the Capitol, also seemed to have acted on his own.

    The claim that Epps “seemed to have acted on his own” is defied by the videos themselves, which show him coordinating with others at the Capitol riots.

    A number of Republican Congressmen have attempted to get answers about Ray Epps’ actual role in January 6. Rep. Thomas Massie, among other Republican congressional members, has questioned Attorney General Merrick Garland about whether there was any FBI provocation involved in the Jan. 6 riots.

    The Department of Justice refused to provide a comment.

    On January 11, Senator Ted Cruz ignited five-alarm fire bells in the establishment press with his questioning of FBI officials over the identity of Ray Epps.

    Senator Cruz didn’t let up. Jill Sanborn, executive assistant director of the National Security Branch, would not confirm or deny it. “Sir, I cannot answer that question,” she said.

    But an interesting connection between Epps and the Feds is that he obtained a lawyer who worked at least nine years as an FBI agent.

    “After graduating from law school in in 1975, [Ray Epps’ lawyer] embarked on a rewarding nine-year career as an FBI Agent with the U.S. Department of Justice commencing in Cleveland and thereafter transferring to Phoenix,” Darren J. Beattie of Revolver News reported. “[Ray Epps’ lawyer] has seen it all, his biggest asset is his relation with prosecutors and law enforcement in ways other lawyers cannot because of his background…”

    Ray Epps is an oddity among the January 6 protesters in that he is directly linked to the initial Capitol grounds breach, where he coordinated with one of the first people to go in, after having previously attempted to entrap Trump supporters to go “into the Capitol!” Nonetheless, he has been defended by the corporate left-wing media and protected by Democrats themselves, all while MAGA tourists who have been locked up for months and even years for the allegedly heinous crime of trespassing suffer while awaiting trial. Epps is still uncharged.

    In spite of the mainstream media’s assurances that January 6 was a perilous moment in U.S. history where the Republic was almost overthrown by unarmed protesters, Ray Epps walks free. It is a central mystery that remains unsolved from the Capitol riots. If there is any justice, the GOP-led House of Representatives will release the unseen 14,000 hours as promised, and help America get to the bottom of what really happened at this historical event once-and-for-all.

    NOW READ:

    NY Times Runs Cover for ‘Trump Supporter’ Who Sparked January 6 Riots

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    OPINION: This article contains commentary which reflects the author's opinion.