The Latest News About Brian Sicknick’s Death is Causing Media Narrative About Capitol Riot to Fall Apart

Written by Kyle Becker
Advertisements

Brian Sicknick, a 13-year veteran of the Capitol police force, was lain to rest after bravely serving his nation at the Capitol riots of January 6th.

Sicknick had died a day later after an attack captured on video. An unidentified subject in a largely pro-Trump mob hurled a fire extinguisher, hitting Officer Sicknick in the head.

But the cause of death for Officer Sicknick is not as open-and-shut as widespread media reports have led many Americans to believe. Despite there being a federal murder investigation, there are several impediments now preventing the building of a case for what is apparently the only non-protester death directly related to the actual Capitol riot.

CNN reports on the latest developments, which cast major doubts about the quality of its own reportage on the Capitol riots:

Authorities have reviewed video and photographs that show Sicknick engaging with rioters amid the siege but have yet to identify a moment in which he suffered his fatal injuries, law enforcement officials familiar with the matter said.

This is the truly remarkable admission, given the tenor of the mainstream media coverage:

According to one law enforcement official, medical examiners did not find signs that the officer sustained any blunt force trauma, so investigators believe that early reports that he was fatally struck by a fire extinguisher are not true.

One possibility being considered by investigators is that Sicknick became ill after interacting with a chemical irritant like pepper spray or bear spray that was deployed in the crowd. But investigators reviewing video of the officer’s time around the Capitol haven’t been able to confirm that in tape that has been recovered so far, the official said.

It has also been speculated that Sicknick may have a pre-existing medical condition, although this is unknown and could not be confirmed.

If a murder case cannot be brought, it would deliver a blow to the mainstream media’s narrative about the deadly Capitol riots. The New York Times earlier reported about the “5 people who died” in the Capitol riot, but it is quite remarkable about the causes of death and who was involved.

Advertisements

Let’s briefly note what the Times reports, beyond Officer Sicknick’s.

Ashli Babbitt, 35, an Air Force veteran from Southern California, was shot and killed by a Capitol Police officer as she clambered through a broken window leading to the Speaker’s Lobby inside the Capitol.

The Times cannot help but smear Babbitt, adding she “celebrated Mr. Trump and QAnon conspiracy theories, and her shooting instantly made her a martyr for far-right activists and Trump loyalists.” This description is totally bereft of sympathy or human emotion, whether coincidentally or by design.

But anyone who watched the video of Babbitt being shot, captured by a pro-Antifa/BLM agitator who happened to be there, as well as the role an extremely suspect agitator who is wanted by the FBI, have major questions about the rationale for shooting this particular unarmed Trump supporter, while rioters ran roughshod throughout the Capitol building with little or no opposition from police.

There was another amongst the crowd, 55-year-old Kevin Greeson, who died of a heart attack. The Times argues about his grieving widow’s characterization of as Greeson as a “good father and motorcycle enthusiast and said he ‘was not there to participate in violence or rioting, nor did he condone such actions.'” The Times points to social media posts, including those on Parler, which it calls a “social-media haven for Trump supporters.”

Another appears to be a pro-Trump activist killed amidst the rioting:

Ms. Boyland appears to have been killed in a crush of fellow rioters during their attempt to fight through a police line, according to videos reviewed by The Times.

And yet aother was a pro-Trump activist who suffered a stroke:

Benjamin Philips, 50, the founder of a pro-Trump website called Trumparoo, was chipper as he drove a van of fellow Trump supporters from their home state of Pennsylvania to Washington. He told The Philadelphia Inquirer that it felt like “the first day of the rest of our lives.”

Mr. Philips died of a stroke in Washington, those who accompanied him to the Capitol told the newspaper. The exact circumstances of his death were still unclear, and his family could not be reached for comment.

So, just to recap, those who died at the Capitol riots include: One Trump supporter shot under questionable circumstances; one who appears to have died from medical injuries related to the rioting; two apparent Trump supporters who died from medical-related issues that may or may not relate the rioting; and the mysterious death of Capitol officer Brian Sicknick.

Advertisements

Even as Officer Sicknick laid in state at the Capitol rotunda, figures like Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez have nonetheless sought to demonize police officers in transparently dishonest accounts. Many on the left have made accusations that the Capitol police “helped” the protesters. This narrative is now being dismantled from several directions: Firstly, Sicknick was not “helping” the rioters when he was despicably attacked.

Secondly, if the police were helping the rioters, what does that say about the entire event? These are officers sworn to protect the Capitol building and the Congressmembers inside. They are indubitably honorable public servants. If they were helping the protesters, they must have been ordered to do it. Period. But why?

President Biden even visited Officer Sicknick, who is deserving of high accolades for serving his country. But the Democrats have sought to exploit his death to vilify 74 million Trump voters, the overwhelming majority of them obviously peaceful and law-abiding. Officer Sicknick’s death is opening up a whole host of questions about the massive reckless negligence of the media reporting the entire Capitol riot event.


OPINION: This article contains commentary which reflects the author's opinion.